World

King Charles, Prince William Meet the crowded queues for the Queen’s coffin

Video: King Charles, Prince William meet large crowds of people waiting in line for the Queen's coffin

Prince Williams and King Charles interacted with some of the people waiting in the queue

London:

King Charles III and his eldest son Prince William were greeted with cheers on Saturday as they shook hands with those who had lined up for hours through London to see Queen Elizabeth’s coffin as it lay in state. before her funeral.

Cries of “God Save the King” were heard from the crowd as the new monarch and heir to the throne thanked members of the public before attention turned to the stream of world leaders arriving to bid their farewells. state on Monday.

“I am very happy. He is very calm, friendly and he is very gentle,” said Geraldine Potts-Ahmad, a secretary in her late 50s. 50 said as she tried to suppress her emotions after shaking Charles’s hand.

“He will become the best king. That tenderness and tenderness, I have seen the queen in it.”

The queen’s death on September 8 at the age of 96, after a record 70 years on the throne, has sparked a surge of emotion.

Members of the public are bravely waiting for more than 25 hours, and chilly night temperatures, to see her flag-covered coffin.

Princes William and Harry were later ordered to pay tribute to Queen Elizabeth II’s eight grandchildren by her coffin, along with tens of thousands of members of the public who lined up around the clock.

The lines have stretched for kilometers along the Thames since Wednesday, when her coffin was brought to the UK parliament complex.

Those inside parliament’s Westminster Hall for the reclining state received a shock late on Friday when a man dashed out of line and approached the coffin, topped with the Royal Crown. .

A live TV feed of mourners was cut short at around 10:00 p.m. (2100 GMT) when police arrested the man, two hours after Charles and three siblings his holding their own vigil in the hallway.

“He has been arrested for an offense under the Public Order Act and is currently in custody,” the Metropolitan Police said.

Faint
About 435 people needed medical treatment, usually from head injuries after fainting in line, London Ambulance Service said.

But Jenna O’Sullivan, a charity worker from Pontypridd in Wales, said her 14-hour wait was worth it after paying her last respects in front of the coffin.

“It was very emotional, with such a peaceful and calm atmosphere,” said the 36-year-old.

“The queue was long but it felt like a celebration. We made some lovely friends.”

Police are ramping up Britain’s biggest-ever security for Monday’s funeral, as hundreds of dignitaries including US President Joe Biden prepare to arrive.

Less than two weeks since becoming prime minister, British Prime Minister Liz Truss has begun a crowded weekend of meetings with world leaders, including her counterparts from New Zealand. , Jacinda Ardern and Australia, Anthony Albanese, at government residence in Chevening country.

On Sunday, she will meet Biden, Irish Taoiseach Michael Martin, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Polish leader Andrzej Duda in Downing Street.

Charles, meanwhile, was scheduled to meet on Saturday with the prime ministers of the Commonwealth of Nations – the 14 former colonies he currently reigns with the UK – including Australia, the Bahamas, Canada, Jamaica and New Zealand. .

From Australia and Canada to Jamaica and Papua New Guinea, they have officially claimed him as their new sovereign.

However, republican movements are gaining ground in many countries, and efforts to keep them all in the royal family will likely be a feature of his reign.

Charles on Friday ended his maiden tour as monarch to the UK’s four countries with a visit to Wales as part of an operation called “Spring Tide” to kick off in his new role.

‘Tide of emotions’
Back in London, Charles joined a 15-minute vigil with his siblings – Princess Anne, Prince Andrew and Prince Edward – around their mother’s coffin on Friday night.

They stood, silent, with their eyes downcast, while members of the public gave their accounts of the past.

The ceremony will be repeated on Saturday night by eight grandchildren, including new heir to the throne Prince William and estranged brother Harry.

Harry – who has participated in two tours with the British army in Afghanistan – has been given special permission by his father to wear a military uniform even though he is no longer a working royal.

The move appears to be the latest olive branch offered by Charles to Harry after the prince and his wife Meghan, who now live in California, accused the royal family of racism.

The private sadness of the queen’s family has been released before the attention of the international community.

But the queen’s youngest son Edward said: “We have been overwhelmed by the wave of emotions that have engulfed us and the sheer number of people who have tried to express their own love, admiration and respect. surname.”

The public can come early Monday to see the coffin before the queen is honored in Britain’s first state funeral in nearly six decades.

The grand ceremony at Westminster Abbey – expected to be watched by billions of people across the globe – will see 142 sailors hauling her lead coffin-carrying chariot.

It will be attended by more than 2,000 guests, but leaders from countries with confrontational relations with Britain such as Russia, Belarus and Afghanistan have not been invited.

Chinese Vice President Wang Qishan will attend, Beijing’s Foreign Ministry confirmed, after a diplomatic spat saw Chinese officials banned from visiting coffins inside parliament.

(This story has not been edited by NDTV staff and is automatically generated from the syndication feed.)

Source link

goznews

Goz News: Update the world's latest breaking news online of the day, breaking news, politics, society today, international mainstream news .Updated news 24/7: Entertainment, Sports...at the World everyday world. Hot news, images, video clips that are updated quickly and reliably.

Related Articles

Back to top button